Advent Bible Study

A Guide to Bible Study Methods Found in Scripture

  • Bible Study Books in Print

    Collection of books with Bible Stories and examples showing how to study scripture.

    Click here to see a list of Books in Print

  • List of Online Bible Study eBooks Available

    Advent Bible Study online eBook Store

    Advent Bible Study online eBook Store

  • Stories on the Gospel of Matthew now available as eBooks

    Short stories on the life and ministry of Jesus

    This Ebook series on Matthew contains more than 100 stories about the people Jesus ministered to as a set of downloads at a modest price.

  • Understanding Parables According To The Gospel Of Mark

    Jesus explains how to understand parables

    This book explains how Jesus taught simple lessons so His disciples could understand all parables and scripture with simple lessons a child can understand.

  • Jesus Teaches About Relationships

    There is a difference between a worldly relationship and one made in Heaven.

    Learn what Jesus taught about relationships established in Eden

  • Understanding the Hebrew Messiah

    The Gospel of Luke

    A book based on Luke's Gospel showing the work of God's Spirit in Jesus' ministry.

  • John Chapters 1-10 eBook

    An in depth look at Jesus' ministry from John's Gospel

    Learn how Jesus followed God's Spirit throughout His ministry.

  • The Tabernacle “T” is for The Cross

  • The Tabernacle, Temple, and Sanctuary: Genesis 1 to Exodus 27

    The Tabernacle, Temple, and Sanctuary: Genesis 1 to Exodus 27

    Series of books on the Tabernacle, its construction, the services and priesthood.

  • Prophecies Fulfilled Genesis to Deuteronomy and Joshua to Chronicles

    It makes sense to learn about the prophecies fulfilled before trying to figure out those still in the future.

    Understanding Prophecies Fulfilled is the key to understanding all prophecy. Stories, studies and study methods explained.

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 83 other followers

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 83 other followers

  • © Copyright 2009 – 2016 Dennis Herman

    Material may be copied and shared with permission at AdventBible@gmailcom. Please include the following information.
    © Copyright 2009 - 2016 Dennis Herman
    https://adventbiblestudy.wordpress.com/
    Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
    AdventBible@gmailcom

  • The Tabernacle, Temple, and Sanctuary

    A new verse by verse look at the Tabernacle

    1st in a new series of books looking at the Tabernacle just as Moses recorded the details.

  • 10% Off Print Books

    10% off Advent Bible Study Print Books discount code

    Click here to get your code for 10% off Advent Bible Study books in print only from CreateSpace

Psalms 37:1-22 The Meek Will Inherit the Earth

Posted by adventbiblestudy on March 16, 2016


Psalms 37:1-22 The Meek Will Inherit the Earth

Matthew 5:1-12 KJ2000 And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he had sat down, his disciples came unto him:And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, (3) Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (4) Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. (5) Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. (6) Blessed are they who do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. (7) Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. (8) Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. (9) Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. (10) Blessed are they who are persecuted for righteousness‘ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (11) Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. (12) Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets who were before you.

As we progress through this series of prophecies in Psalms we can see how lessons are progressing from one form of study to the next. In this case it’s important to look at an understand the fulfillment before looking at the prophecy. In Matthew 5, Jesus quotes a portion of Psalm 37 in His sermon on the mountain. “Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.” Using a chart will show us the main theme Jesus is teaching.

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted for righteousness‘ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Now we can see two things, the progression Jesus used which highlights a series of related words and phrases.

Blessed are the poor

Blessed are they that mourn

Blessed are the meek

Blessed are they who do hunger and thirst

The words poor, mourn, meek, hunger, and thirst are all related. Each of them illustrates something the blessed lack. Poor is lacking wealth. We mourn when we loose something or see we lack something. Meekness is the lack of pride. This shows the beginning of Jesus’ progression. Hunger and thirst is the lack of food and water. Jesus is drawing us away from a worldly view of what He is teaching into a spiritual view. And Jesus said unto them, “I am the bread of life: he that comes to me shall never hunger; and he that believes on me shall never thirst.” (John 6:35 KJ2000). “He that believes on me, as the scripture has said, out of his heart shall flow rivers of living water.” (But this spoke he of the Spirit, whom they that believe on him should receive: for the Holy Spirit was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified.) (John 7:38-39 KJ2000).

Jesus used contrasts in each of those four statements. When we look at them together we see a clear message of hope established by the promises Jesus gave.

theirs is the kingdom of heaven

for they shall be comforted

they shall inherit the earth

for they shall be filled

In the first four sentences Jesus showed what His followers lack and what they can achieve by following Him. By looking ahead at the explanations Jesus provided to explain spiritual food and water, we understand how a connection to Jesus is maintained. In the next three sentences Jesus tells us the qualities His followers will possess.

Blessed are the merciful

Blessed are the pure in heart

Blessed are the peacemakers

Jesus is not asking for much. He wants us to be merciful, pure in heart, and a peacemaker. It doesn’t seem like a difficult task. Each of these three comes with a reward.

they shall obtain mercy.

they shall see God.

they shall be called the children of God

Notice how Jesus keeps repeating the word they? He is drawing attention to an individual effort. It’s far more than a choice, it requires skill and is a learning process. In this world it’s not an easy task to accomplish. Jesus doesn’t hide the fact there will be opposition. Jesus knows this world and sees how it will react to the merciful and pure in heart. Jesus doesn’t want us to miss this point, so He repeats it.

Blessed are they who are persecuted for righteousness‘ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

One of the most important Bible Study rules is to look up and study the chapter Jesus quotes from. In this case we can see how Jesus only explained a portion of Psalm 37.

Psalms 37:1-22 KJ2000 [A Psalm of David.] Fret not yourself because of evildoers, neither be you envious of the workers of iniquity. (2) For they shall soon be cut down like the grass, and wither as the green herb. (3) Trust in the LORD, and do good; so shall you dwell in the land, and verily you shall be fed. (4) Delight yourself also in the LORD; and he shall give you the desires of your heart. (5) Commit your way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass. (6) And he shall bring forth your righteousness as the light, and your justice as the noonday. (7) Rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him: fret not yourself because of him who prospers in his way, because of the man who brings wicked devices to pass. (8) Cease from anger, and forsake wrath: fret not yourself in any way to do evil. (9) For evildoers shall be cut off: but those that wait upon the LORD, they shall inherit the earth. (10) For yet a little while, and the wicked shall not be: yea, you shall diligently consider his place, and it shall not be. (11) But the meek shall inherit the earth; and shall delight themselves in the abundance of peace. (12) The wicked plots against the just, and gnashes upon him with his teeth. (13) The Lord shall laugh at him: for he sees that his day is coming. (14) The wicked have drawn out the sword, and have bent their bow, to cast down the poor and needy, and to slay such as be of upright behavior. (15) Their sword shall enter into their own heart, and their bows shall be broken. (16) A little that a righteous man has is better than the riches of many wicked. (17) For the arms of the wicked shall be broken: but the LORD upholds the righteous. (18) The LORD knows the days of the upright: and their inheritance shall be forever. (19) They shall not be ashamed in the evil time: and in the days of famine they shall be satisfied. (20) But the wicked shall perish, and the enemies of the LORD shall be as the fat of lambs: they shall vanish; into smoke shall they vanish away. (21) The wicked borrows, and pays not again: but the righteous shows mercy, and gives. (22) For such as be blessed of him shall inherit the earth; and they that be cursed of him shall be cut off.

Comparing the two chapters its easy to see how one explains the other by adding greater detail. When we combine related texts we can see why Jesus knew it was important to send people back to scripture. Remember that Jesus sent His Spirit to guide us through these lessons. But His Spirit can’t accomplish anything until we make the decision to spend time to compare the scripture He is pointing to.

Fret not yourself because of evildoers, neither be you envious of the workers of iniquity. For they shall soon be cut down like the grass, and wither as the green herb.

Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets who were before you.

Trust in the LORD, and do good; so shall you dwell in the land, and verily you shall be fed. Delight yourself also in the LORD; and he shall give you the desires of your heart.

Blessed are they who do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Commit your way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass. And he shall bring forth your righteousness as the light, and your justice as the noonday. Rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him: fret not yourself because of him who prospers in his way, because of the man who brings wicked devices to pass.

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

The list goes on throughout the two chapters. David’s reference to righteousness as light is explained by Jesus in greater detail. “You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a lamp, and put it under a bushel, but on a lamp stand; and it gives light unto all that are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 5:14-16 KJ2000). The lesson in this prophecy shows how to take your time and compare scripture to scripture. Prophecies are often used to exemplify a lesson by adding greater detail. To do this they must be kept within the context of scripture. People tend to take scripture out of context, twisting them around to apply them in a manner they were never intended to be used. Jesus knows prophecies far better than we ever will and wrote these two chapters to teach an important lesson we need to pay attention to.

Jesus told His disciples about the rough road ahead. He didn’t try painting a deceptive picture to gain a following. Jesus told the full story using contrasts. Heaven is gained when we turn our hearts and minds to peace and mercy. When we do, the enemy will use the world against us. Its a simple concept. Jesus used contrast to shows us how to understand the lessons between Psalm 37 and Matthew 5. There may not be a greater contrast in the Bible than these two chapters. Jesus taught on a positive note telling His disciples how they needed to act. The prophecy in Psalm 37 dwells on the actions of the world. We see that right away when we highlight the key words. Evildoers, wicked, and enemy are found throughout the prophecy which makes it clear, they will be destroyed when the prophecy is fulfilled.

God’s timing is the hardest lesson to learn. That’s because prophecies repeat over time. We’ve seen how the prophecy in Psalm 35 related to Jesus’ trial as well as Paul’s who was a symbol for all of Jesus’ followers. We also see how Jesus presented His promises and warnings on a personal level. Not all Christians will go through the same trials Paul faced. Neither will they make the same mistakes. Almost everyone whose opened the Bible and read portions of it has seen how it relates to their personal experiences on one level or another. Personal experiences may not be the greater spiritual fulfillment of the prophecy but it is a way God reaches out on an individual level. Here we see another example of how a prophecy is fulfilled on different levels at different times. “The meek shall inherit the earth; and shall delight themselves in the abundance of peace.” This was fulfilled when Jesus began His ministry when He explained how His followers will find peace by showing mercy and seek peace. God’s promise was certain long before He spoke it or had it recorded in scripture. How it was fulfilled was revealed when Jesus died on the cross and rose from the grave. We can receive the inheritance now and in the future. One prophecy can span many time segments. This is why we’re told, “God’s time is not our time.” It takes more to understand than days, years, and dates which are the physical aspects of time. It takes a close relationship with God to understand the spiritual side of God’s timing. Everyday God’s Spirit reaches out to every person in this world. We have no idea what God has planned for all those people. Our relationship with God should teach us how to rely on His Spirit to help us with our problems, and allow God’s Spirit to help others. Some times it takes more discipline not to get involved. We have to learn to listen to God’s voice to know how much we need to get involved and when. These studies are designed to show us a part of God’s personality, how He presents and explains details. Some times lessons seem obvious, although we have to admit we don’t always follow the right examples. Other times chapters combine to reveal lessons we never considered. Either case, we need to look back and review to see how they are introduced and taught. If we’re Christ’s disciples, we’re supposed to be studying from Him, learning to be like Him. We need to learn what Jesus taught, how He taught, when and to whom He taught. Then we need to pray and listen so we hear the command when we’re sent out. Since we’ve already looked at the introductions and a number of texts between the two chapters, it’s time to compare the summations.

Matthew 5:44-48 KJ2000 But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them who despitefully use you, and persecute you; (45) That you may be the children of your Father who is in heaven: for he makes his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. (46) For if you love them who love you, what reward have you? do not even the tax collectors the same? (47) And if you greet your brethren only, what do you more than others? do not even the tax collectors so? (48) Be you therefore perfect, even as your Father who is in heaven is perfect.

Psalms 37:35-40 KJ2000 I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree. (36) Yet he passed away, and, lo, he was not: yea, I sought him, but he could not be found. (37) Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright: for the end of that man is peace. (38) But the transgressors shall be destroyed together: the end of the wicked shall be cut off. (39) But the salvation of the righteous is of the LORD: he is their strength in the time of trouble. (40) And the LORD shall help them, and deliver them: he shall deliver them from the wicked, and save them, because they trust in him.

Jesus introduces the new key word love in the conclusion of this chapter which is the center of His sermon. He also repeats the word perfect which links it to the conclusion of Psalm 37. Although Psalm 37 and Matthew 5 are contrasts, with Psalm 37 explaining what will happen to wicked people who persecute God’s children, Jesus tells His disciples to love and pray for their enemies. Jesus tells His disciples to be different than the world. And why not? Our God is different from this world. Our role in His plan of salvation is to find out how God and Heaven are different and tell other people about it. That was the theme of Jesus sermon.

David may not have know all of God’s plan, but he sums up a great deal of it at the end of Psalm 37. There are only two classes, those who are saved and those who are lost. David doesn’t provide a lot of details, but tells us the wicked will be in great power. This is the sort of statement pretend prophets like to grasp onto and elaborate on under their own terms. You’ll see a total lack of disregard for context in their estimations. Once we understand this prophecy and how Jesus used it in His sermon and elaborated on some of the details, you can understand one major point. If Jesus didn’t spend His time and efforts teaching details about the wicked, how and why should we listen to modern prophets on the subject? We need to concentrate on what Jesus taught on the subject, how to act which involves loving and praying for our enemies. We’re given assurance God will save and deliver us from this world. That should be enough for us. How can we ever expect to learn to listen to God’s spoken voice if we don’t develop skills to understand His written Word?

Another aspect of Bible Study is to look at the personalities involved in the stories. Where were they in their walk with God? What were they facing? What events led up to the event? David faced all kinds of challenges in his life. We can’t be certain what challenge he was facing when he wrote this Psalm or who was threatening him at the time. We know David faced off against a giant when the rest of Israel’s army shivered in fear. The key word in 1 Samuel 17 is battle, calling attention to the spiritual battles we all face. Samuel told us how we have to face those battles. And all this assembly shall know that the LORD saves not with sword and spear: for the battle is the LORD’s, and he will give you into our hands. (1 Samuel 17:47 KJ2000). When David grew, Saul put him in charge of Israel’s army. After a number of victories Saul became jealous of David. A number of times Saul forgot David was the only relief from the evil spirit that tormented him. Jealousy overcame Saul when he tried to kill David. Pride was more important to Saul then the relief David provided. Saul pursued David for years as God guided him from one safe hold to another. Saul and his sons died in battle opening the way for David to take the throne. By that time David accumulated a number of wives and added more after being crowned king. Saul’s jealousy was replaced by David’s many wives. War also waged on all sides of Israel. God granted one victory after another, but David still felt his position required an effort on his end. Since David no longer personally led the army, worry seemed like the thing to do. David’s position required more than fighting wars and calming family quarrels. As king, David took on the role of judge. He also dwelt with trade agreements and other details such as maintaining trade routes and feeding hundreds of officials and servants. Most of the worry was self induced. When David had Uriah killed so he could marry his wife, it showed how little David appreciated people at his command and trusted them. Once you turn your back on one person, it becomes more difficult to trust others. This was one of the few lessons David taught Solomon before he handed the kingdom down to him. It wasn’t the lesson God wanted David to hand down, but it was all David knew.

If David could have kept the faith he had as a youth, he could have averted his worries and a lot of pain. What changed David? His faith in God was secure until he took the throne. Power changed David, another lesson we can see. David should have learned a lesson from Saul’s mistrust and jealousy. Instead of learning the lesson, David repeated it when jealousy engulfed him, causing him to execute one of his trusted mighty men of valor. One of David’s weak spots was women. The boy who stood alone in a valley against a giant fell to the beauty, touch, and kind words of a woman. The enemy found a weak spot and took advantage.

Still David listened to God and remembered how God defeated his enemies. David was also shown the future when God will remove all evil from this world. Still, David’s lack of faith kept him from seeing all the details. Imagine how David could have understood much more about the prophecies he wrote if his faith remained strong. One of the most important lessons we see on a spiritual level is how David’s lack of faith effected his ability to teach the world about the God he served. As king it was David’s role to assist the priests in telling the world about God. Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren: and the spirit of the LORD came upon David from that day forward. So Samuel rose up, and went to Ramah. (1 Samuel 16:13 KJ2000). All of us have God’s Spirit on us, but few know how to listen and follow. The world can have a mighty pull on each of us. Its a battle much like the one David faced against Goliath. When we overcome one fear and gain victory in one battle, it doesn’t stop the enemy from waging war on another front. Satan doesn’t depend on a single front to attack. The greatest king and army commander Israel knew fell victim to Satan’s attacks. David fell but still clung onto God. His past experiences taught David how God is able to put down all his enemies including Satan, who one day will be destroyed.

Jesus led a childhood much different than David. For one thing, if Jesus made one mistake, forgot one lesson, sinned only once, who knows if any of us would be here today. Jesus had to get it right the first time. Somehow God was able to reach Jesus at a very young age, protect and teach Him so He knew right from wrong. Jesus’ life wasn’t easy. David’s prophecy shows us how wicked people lived to take advantage of people who only wanted to live in peace and treat everyone fairly. We see the same thing today, shysters and people making a living from scams, looking for honest people to prey upon. They think they’re stupid and look at them as easy prey. Can you imagine what Jesus went through as He grew up? Every dishonest merchant for miles around must have tried to take advantage of Him for nothing more than to make a name for himself. Jesus’ honesty was legendary before He began His ministry. Jesus was smart enough not to attract attention. He never looked for praise or recognition. When Jesus helped a widow it was between Himself and her. Helping people opened doors to His personal ministry which was developed long before His call to public ministry. While John the Baptist was being instructed in the wilderness, Jesus received His instructions in the home, his father’s workshop, and in the streets and synagogues of Nazareth.

As Jesus grew, things became more difficult. You know what happens to kids who don’t follow the crowd, who stand out as the good one. The older, larger kids do their best to knock him down a few notches. Without knowing it they become Satan’s little agents because they are easy to influence, to push from on degree to the next. This is where Jesus learned to forgive people because they didn’t realize what they were doing.

Of course scripture was a main source of information and inspiration for Jesus. The only place He could read God’s Word was in the local synagogue. This also opened doors for Jesus to discuss and share the wonders of God’s Word and the lessons it taught. Long discussions with the local priests was one of the few sources of refuge and solitude in Jesus’ earliest days. They were also some of the most trying as He tried to explain truths in God’s Word He understood, but were not in line with acceptable customs, doctrines, and traditions. Those experiences showed Jesus some of the trials ahead. Scripture also played a major role in preparing Jesus for the trials ahead. The prophecies David and the other prophets wrote generations ago were about the life Jesus was living. At last Jesus was a man and prepared to face the world in a ministry that would forever change the world.

When Jesus climbed the mountain with His disciples, He knew the lessons He needed to teach. He lived through many of the trials and read about many others. He knew the trials He was about to face and the trials His followers were going to endure. Jesus already lived through many of them before He gathered His disciples. His ministry was an example for them to learn from. The prophecies also taught Jesus how men forget, how people look for their own solutions, and how people who turn to God during trials and turn away after God delivers them. Many of the prophecies were meant to teach Jesus how people react to situations which was far different than His reaction to trails. Jesus had to know both sides of every situation, even thought He could only live one. Jesus could never feel the emotion of making the wrong choice, of turning away from God and relying on Himself.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: